This Week in Open Source

bourbon

Our set of sass mixins, bourbon, saw a quick fix from Travis Haynes (travishaynes), who moved the HTML5 input types into the addons directory (2c7c527). Phil LaPier (plapier) cleaned the input types mixin, removing seven needless lines and then released version 0.1.9 of bourbon (c7027db).

factory_girl

We have this test fixture gem named factory_girl. You might have heard of it. Joshua Clayton (joshuaclayton) sure has; he started with some nice refactoring to change from @options to individually-defined instance variables, removing the need for complex trait assignment (3749056 and c38bac9); he followed the principle of least surprise, allowing users to define parent factories after the children (e28bdb8 and da3af82). Whoa, indeed.

capybara-webkit

The headless JavaScript integration test driver, capybara-webkit, saw more features and improvements. Niklas Baumstark (niklasb) gave us a more diff-friendly list of C++ headers (dc5130c) as a set up for cookie support (fb119f6).

Nicolas Sanguinetti (foca) sent a non-backward-compatible pull request, renaming the capybara-webkit require to capybara/webkit, which some people who write weekly blog posts disagree with (eeeddbd). To top it off, Matthew Mongeau (halogenandtoast) fixed a bug with URLs with anchors (f75bc3d) and worked around a nuance of the Ruby parser (89bee3c).

Also, right now, the capybara lead and capybara-webkit lead are pairing. The magic of RubyConf.

paperclip

paperclip may be the finest file uploading gem for Rails. Jon Yurek (jyurek) did some internal cleanups, extracting the options hash into its own object (3e6d933 and b948f96). Joost Baaij (tilsammans) added determinism to the rake task that refreshes thumbnails, ordering by the database ID, with the idea that a crashed refresh could be restarted more easily. Perhaps this is a bandage instead of a fix (0df5a96). Pavel Forkert (fxposter) continued with previous work on fixing a memory leak, passing strings instead of objects (7243015 and 7a2e2ed).

Mike Burns

Hound automatically reviews Ruby, JavaScript, and CoffeeScript code in your GitHub pull requests and comments on style violations. It is free for open source repos and $12/month per private repo.